Lucknow, UP, India, 226028

SUPREME COURT RECOGNIZING THE UNRECOGNIZED GROUND OF DIVORCE: R SRINIVAS KUMAR V. R SHAMETHA

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INTRODUCTION

The irretrievable breakdown of a marriage is a ground on which a decree of divorce has been permitted regularly. The Supreme Court has allowed such disintegrations of relationships by practicing powers under Article 142 of the Constitution of India. In the accompanying case, nonetheless, the Hon’ble Court didn’t have any ground in law dependent on which it might have conceded such a pronouncement. What was the choice made by the Court?

BACKGROUND OF FACTS

The marriage between the appealing party and the respondent had occurred on 09.05.1993. They had a child who was conceived on 29.08.1995. As indicated by the husband, there were sure contrasts among him and the respondent and he professed to have endured mental brutality. Besides, until 1997, the spouse (wife) likewise proceeded to remain at her parental house a few times. Following this, the spouse (husband) petitioned for a separation in 1999 under the watchful eye of the Family Court at Hyderabad under Sections 13(1) (ia) and (ib) of the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955. The appeal under the watchful eye of the Family Court was made on the ground of savagery which the spouse (husband) neglected to demonstrate. The court likewise kept the pronouncement from getting a divorce on the ground of irretrievable breakdown of a marriage.

Following this, the oppressed spouse litigant moved to bid under the steady gaze of the High Court, once more, on the ground of irretrievable breakdown of the marriage. The High Court of Andhra Pradesh in 2012 affirmed the choice of the Family Court and excused the appeal made by the spouse in the given issue following which an appeal was brought under the steady gaze of the Supreme Court.

The facts introduced under the watchful eye of the Supreme Court of India were that the couple was not living together and that this was the situation for more than 22 years. It was communicated in the interest of the litigant spouse that it was a circumstance of irretrievable breakdown of marriage and that the Supreme Court must do equity to both the parties, by summoning the forces under Article 142 of the Constitution of India. In any case, in instances of irretrievable breakdown of the marriage, if both of the gatherings aren’t happy to disintegrate, a declaration of separation can’t be allowed.

The Hon’ble Supreme Court passed a judgment dependent on these facts.

Another significant actuality to be noted here is that the lost breakdown of the marriage isn’t perceived as a ground for separation under any law. It has been acknowledged as a ground-dependent point of reference and isn’t referenced in the genuine Hindu Marriage Act, 1955.

ISSUES

  1. Whether it is a case of irretrievable breakdown of the marriage.

In the case of an irretrievable breakdown of the marriage, the spouse is no longer willing to live with one another accordingly, destroying their relationship of being a couple. In the end, the irretrievable breakdown of the marriage could be interpreted in a few different ways, for example, dwelling independently, etc. However, it was prior perceived by the Court that for a union to be considered irretrievably separated, there will be a consent of both the gatherings, which is absent in the given case.

By what method can a marriage be separated irretrievably on the off chance that one of the gatherings is as yet ready to proceed with the relationship? This carries us to the following issue.

  1. Whether a decree of divorce may be granted despite one of the parties being unwilling.

On account of the irretrievable breakdown of the marriage, it had been declared in the Hitesh Bhatnagar versus Deepa Bhatnagar case of 2011 that both the spouse and the wife must agree to and show consent to the dissolution of marriage. However, in such a circumstance as the given case, can a declaration of separation be conceded regardless of whether one of the gatherings isn’t eager to agree to the dissolution of marriage?

ARGUMENTS AND PROCEEDING

The first appeal for a decree of separation was recorded by the appealing party spouse in the year 1999 under the watchful eye of the Family Court of Hyderabad. Following the disappointment of the spouse to demonstrate that savagery had been caused on him by the respondent-wife, the appeal had been excused. An appeal under the steady gaze of the High Court by the spouse was brought indeed on the ground of mercilessness and an irretrievable breakdown of a marriage. However, the High Court of Andhra Pradesh just affirmed the choice taken by the lower court and excused the appeal.

The appellant spouse at that point petitioned for an appeal under the steady gaze of the Supreme Court of India, looking for an announcement for separation on the ground of irretrievable able breakdown of marriage alone.

Sri Guru Krishna Kumar, the Learned Senior Advocate set forth the contention that the appealing party spouse and the respondent-wife had been living independently for a very long time. He further communicated that the marriage was broken irretrievable and that the marriage ought to be dissolved on the ground of irretrievable breakdown of marriage in the exercise of the powers of the Supreme Court under Article 142 of the Indian Constitution. He likewise communicated the appealing party spouse’s willingness to pay the respondent-wife a singular amount sum for the situation that the decree of separation was allowed.

The learned Advocate, Shri Jayant Kumar, for the sake of the respondent-spouse, however, said that a decree of separation couldn’t be allowed on the ground of an irretrievable breakdown of marriage in the event that one of the gatherings was not consenting or was not willing.

There were a few cases referred to by the scholarly Counsels for both the parties. These contentions for the benefit of both the gatherings in the Supreme Court were upheld intensely by the accompanying two cases:

Naveen Kohli versus Neelu Kohli (2006) 4 SCC 558: Facts of this case would be that the appellant and respondent was a married couple and that the spouse petitioned for a decree of separation dependent on a few grounds. The separation had been allowed by the Supreme Court in the remark of watching the way that the marriage had, actually, separated irretrievable. The Supreme Court likewise recommended for this situation that the Hindu Marriage Act 1955 be revised to incorporate the ground of irretrievable breakdown of the marriage.

In light of this judgment, the Learned Senior Advocate for the spouse appellant contended that the marriage is referred to have unmistakably been irretrievable harmed and had totally separated, explicitly rotating around the way that the appealing party husband and respondent-wife had been living independently for a very long time.

Hitesh Bhatnagar versus Deepa Bhatnagar (2011) 5 SCC 234: For this situation, the couple had both applied for separation. In any case, the spouse pulled back her consent before the decree of separation could be conceded because of which it was not permitted by the lower court. At the point when the issue arrived at the Supreme Court, the interest for the pronouncement of separation was excused. This was on the grounds that the respondent-spouse in her announcements communicated that she didn’t need separation and had faith in her marriage. Because of this, the marriage couldn’t have been considered to have irretrievably separated.

From this case, it turns out to be evident that even for the situation that a marriage might be separated, a pronouncement of separation can’t be allowed on the ground of irretrievable breakdown of marriage except if both the gatherings agree to it. The announcement of separation was consequently not allowed.

It was based on this judgment that the scholarly Counsel for the respondent spouse set forth the contention that the marriage being referred to ought not to be broken upon the ground of irretrievable breakdown of marriage since the respondent-wife doesn’t agree to the equivalent.

JUDGMENT

The Hon’ble Supreme Court permitted the application of separation by the appealing party spouse. Despite the fact that there was no ground in law to help the separation, it created the impression that the litigant and respondent were just married in name. However, their marriage was dead and just had a legitimate significance. This was demonstrated by the way that they had been living independently for a very long time and that any effort to spare their marriage had failed. Considering, that marriage can be viewed as having irretrievably separated.

The Hon’ble Supreme Court in a prior judgment had expressed that a pronouncement of separation may possibly be conceded if both the gatherings are eager to dissolve the marriage and are consenting to it. The given case, however, clarifies that in certain circumstances, the marriage between two people may exist just in an authoritative document. Despite the fact that the current facts of the case didn’t give a legitimate ground dependent on which the separation could be without a doubt, the Court decided for the litigant spouse. The Court permitted the application of separation by the spouse and the marriage dissolved by practicing powers under Article 142 of the Constitution of India on the state of lasting provision of Rs. 20 lakh to be paid by the appealing party spouse to the wife.

This is an interesting improvement with regards to the setting of separations allowed on the grounds of irretrievable breakdown of the marriage. By what means can a marriage be called irretrievably separated on the off chance that one of the gatherings was still ready to put forth an attempt? How could it be that living independently for a long period of time can be considered as confirmation of a breakdown of a marriage? A few different inquiries might be brought up to issue the judgment of this case.

The Supreme Court with this judgment, in any case, has made a way for separation from appeals to be conceded for relationships that exist just on paper and not generally. It has been depicted as “the acknowledgment of the pointlessness of a totally bombed marriage being proceeded with just on paper” in the judgment of Munish Kakkar versus Nidhi Kakkar (2019) INSC 1065.

The award of the decree of separation in this appeal is hence considering the bigger picture of making sure about the privileges of the people in question. Article 142 of the Constitution of India engages the Supreme Court to take such choices and it is sure that this case will be considered as a milestone case for a few future cases. One such case, as referenced above, is Munish Kakkar versus Nidhi Kakkar (2019) INSC 1065, wherein the Court additionally communicated that a dead letter marriage just made a difficult connection between the life partners. The judgment refers to the instance of R Srinivas Kumar versus R Shametha and further communicates the expressions of the Court and their goals. The judgment for a similar further expressed:

“We do accept that not exclusively is the continuity of this marriage unproductive, yet it is making further enthusiastic injury and unsettling influence both the gatherings. The sooner this reaches a conclusion, the better it would be, for both the gatherings. Our lone expectation is that with the finish of these procedures, which come full circle in separation between the gatherings, the different sides would see the foolishness of proceeding with other lawful procedures and cause an undertaking to even to finish those.”

The above lines from the December 2019 judgment further explain the expectations of the Supreme Court and the thinking in their judgment on account of R Srinivas Kumar versus R Shametha. The choice of the above case was impacted by similar standards of cutting off a dead letter association.

Subsequently, despite the fact that the irretrievable breakdown of a marriage isn’t perceived by a specific law as a ground for separate, it is as yet a significant viewpoint as has been set up in point of reference. Also, in spite of the fact that the award of the decree of separation on the ground of irretrievable breakdown of marriage despite the nonappearance of the consent of the two parties isn’t administered by any law, it is a significant point of reference for future cases.

CONCLUSION

The above choice is another point of reference set with regards to separation under Hindu Law. The Supreme Court passed this judgment despite the way that the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 doesn’t perceive an irretrievable breakdown in marriage as a ground for separation. It is interesting to perceive how this choice influences future separation cases.

Author(s) Name: Adnan Athar Quraishi (IntegralUniversity, Lucknow)

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